Reading Program

Six Mile Regional Library Receives Edwardsville Community Foundation’s Healing Illinois Grant

Tuesday, August 17th, 2021

Six Mile Regional Library District received a Healing Illinois grant from the Edwardsville Community Foundation. The grant was available to schools and libraries to assist in the efforts to teach children and adults about racial differences through books.

The Edwardsville Community Foundation is a group of local business and community leaders founded to impact the quality of life in the local communities, including: Edwardsville, Glen Carbon, Hamel, Moro, Dorsey and Worden and surrounding areas.

Six Mile Regional Library District used these grant funds to create multigenerational book kits. Each kit is designed to help facilitate conversations no matter the age.

There are eleven kits divided into two categories, Tough Topics and Experience Stories. The Tough Topics kits are primarily composed of non-fiction books about various issues including anti racism, immigration and activism. The Experience Stories kits are composed of fiction books that highlight lives of characters of minority backgrounds including, African Americans, Muslims and Asian Americans. All kits include one adult book, one teen book, one juvenile book and one picture book, plus a folder containing discussion questions.

The book kits are great for families to share together, inspire reading, and family discussions. They also work well for small book clubs or anyone interested in a particular topic or experience. You can find the kits in the parent collection of the youth department at our Delmar Avenue location or request one through our online catalog.

Multigenerational Book Kits

Tough Topics

  • Activism
  • Anti Racism
  • Housing Insecurity
  • Immigration
  • Incarceration
  • White Privilege

Experience Stories

  • African American
  • Asian American
  • First Nation
  • Latin American
  • Muslim American


Reading Colors Your World! 2021 Summer All Ages Reading Challenge

Thursday, May 13th, 2021

Six Mile Regional Library District announces it’s 2021 Summer Reading Challenge. This year’s theme is Reading Colors Your World! 

Reading Colors Your World has a broad motif of “colors” that provide context for exploring humanity, nature, culture, and science, as well as demonstrates how libraries and reading can expand our world through kindness, growth, and community. Library customers young and old will be encouraged to be creative, try new things, explore art, and find beauty in diversity.

Each year the SMRLD summer reading theme is decided by iREAD. Who is iREAD? Librarians, which currently includes our very own Youth Service Manager, Erica Hanke-Young; the readers of all ages infant through adult participate each year; and the renowned illustrators create artwork for our materials. Where is iREAD? Developed by the Illinois Library Association, the program is adopted in other states including Minnesota, California, Alaska, Iowa, and Oregon, and worldwide by the Department of Defense for libraries on military bases. iREAD is implemented in thousands of individual libraries across the country.

Why participate?

There is also a serious side to summer reading. Research has shown that reading over the summer prevents summer reading loss. Studies also indicate children who read recreationally outperform those who don’t. They also read more when they can choose materials based on their own interests. Six Mile Regional Library District is committed to supporting lifelong learning and educational enrichment for all ages.

With the 2021 Summer Reading Challenge, Teens have the opportunity to choose how they would like to engage with the Six Mile Regional Library District. The Teen Reading Challenge includes many different ways for teens to earn reading credit through various challenges and reading badges. This allows for each teen to tailor the program to their own personal interests and needs.

The summer reading challenge is not just for kids! Ten years ago, we expanded our summer reading challenge to include adults so no matter your age everyone can participate in the fun.  We encourage you to read or listen all year long and challenge you to finish an extra book or two over the summer.  When you show off your reading habits, it encourages your kids, grandkids, and neighbors’ kids to pick up a book and read as well.  No matter how many books you read this summer, everyone who has registered for summer reading will be entered into a weekly drawing for a Reading Colors Your World ceramic mug.  If you do complete the summer challenge, you will receive a special edition SMRLD summer reading t-shirt.  

How to participate?

There are two ways to sign up for the challenge. The first is online through Beanstack.  What is Beanstack, you ask?  It is an online platform to keep track of your reading.  With Beanstack, you are able to participate in the library’s reading challenges and log your family’s reading through the SMRLD Beanstack website, the mobile app, or connect through Alexa.  As you log your books, you earn badges that correspond to milestones within the reading challenge. You can also write reviews for books, read other reviews from Six Mile Library users, and opt to receive weekly book recommendations.  It is an interactive experience you take anywhere, without worrying about keeping track of a piece of paper!

Beanstack

How do I use Beanstack?

Paper

If you still prefer paper, you may register in person at either library and pick up a paper log.  Kids and teens will register in the Youth Services department and adults will register at the Customer Service desk. Once you complete a book, you will add the title and author to the paper log.  When you have completed the challenge, return the log to the desk where you received it.

Read along with 62040 this summer and let reading color your world!

Important Dates 

The challenge begins on May 28, however if you choose to use Beanstack you may preregister starting May 21.The challenge ends on July 23.    

All Ages Summer Reading Challenge Finale: Saturday, July 24  | 11 AM at Worthen Park, 2599 Parkview Drive

Get Your Challenge Completion T-shirt Prize at the Shirts Galore Mobile Printer & Enjoy the Bubble Bus!

 

 


Librarian Reads: November 2020 Book Review and Recommendation

Monday, November 2nd, 2020

Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann

Who knew?  I certainly didn’t.  In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian Nation.  And why was that?  Because they retained the mineral rights to the lands in Oklahoma to which they had been relocated – they owned the “underground reservation” that was rich with oil during the boom times.

While to some this might seem like a really fortunate life, for the Osage it was cursed with murder, misfortune, and disaster.  And, for the United States, it was the birth of the FBI.  The “Reign of Terror,” as this time in Osage history is known, was only finally dealt with by an undercover team leading the Bureau of Investigation’s first substantial case.

The story illuminates what was possibly one of the biggest serial murder conspiracies in US history and one of the most forgotten.  From the 1910s through the 1930s hundreds of the Osage were murdered for their “headrights” – the legal grant of lands, or in this case the underground mineral rights.  At that time there were about 2,000 Osage who were registered on the tribal roll; each one of them received a headright, or their individual share in the mineral trust.  Headrights could not be sold, they could only be inherited, which made the Osage quite desirable spouses for unscrupulous persons.

At the zenith of the oil boom in Oklahoma, in the 1920s, the Osage had accumulated millions and millions of dollars, equivalent to about $400 million today.  BUT the Osage control of and access to their money was limited by restrictions imposed by the US government.  Many of the Osage were assigned guardians to oversee and supervise how the Osage spent their money.  Becoming an Osage guardian was also a desirable position that was maintained by a handful of untrustworthy people.

This is a tale of families who were being methodically whittled down in order to funnel wealth for easier access by shameless reprobates.  Reading like a novel, this book is full of intrigue, mystery, sleuthing, and human interest.  Racism against Native Americans is startling and unfortunate.  Using primary sources including both published and unpublished letters, diaries, family papers, and records from the FBI and other sources, the author paints a vivid picture.  I recommend this title to those who enjoy history, mystery, thrillers, memoirs, and just plain interesting stories.

Tina Hubert, Executive Director Six Mile Regional Library District

Killers of the Flower Moon is available from the Six Mile Regional Library District in hardback, audiobook, as an e-book and an e-audiobook.  For more information, visit elibrary.smrld.org or call 618-452-6238 ext. 730.

Ever wonder what your SMRLD librarians are reading? Well now you can follow along at smrld.org/librarianreads with some of their recommendations.


Librarian Reads: October 2020 Book Review and Recommendation

Tuesday, October 13th, 2020

Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

As a teen I was enthralled with horror stories.  I grew up reading HP Lovecraft, Edgar Allen Poe, Shirley Jackson, Ray Bradbury, Stephen King, Anne Rice, and more.  I left the horror story stage behind and haven’t really read the genre for years.  Well, it seems this is a good year to revisit it.  I recently spent a Saturday reading this tale from beginning to end – everything else was put on hold.

Mexican Gothic is full of mystery and intrigue surrounded by the supernatural and unknown – a classic gothic novel.  It’s more psychological horror than gore.  In 1950s Mexico, Noemi Taboada is a glamorous debutante more interested in her own independence than being settled.  After receiving a frantic letter from her newly-wed cousin begging someone to save her, Noemi travels to rescue her cousin Catalina, with the promise from her father that she can attend the university of her choice if she will only do this one thing.

Arriving at the husband’s remote old family mansion in the mountains, Noemi has a true mystery to unravel.  Catalina is kept secreted in her bedroom and Noemi roams the mansion and grounds trying to deduce what’s really going on.  Noemi is a tough cookie; she’s not afraid of her cousin’s new husband who is both intimidating and alluring or the husband’s forbidding father or sister.  She uses the husband’s young nephew to escape to the nearby town to send letters back to her family and to seek advice from both the town doctor and local wise woman.  The family seemingly has a strange hold over the town and the mountain full of some dark ancient knowledge.

With plenty of menace, this tale evokes the atmosphere of the horror movies from the 1930s and 40s, where violin music would play in the background of the foggy craggy scenery.  The story starts a little slow, but builds to a surprising crescendo.  I thought I had it all figured out only to discover a truly unexpected ending.  I couldn’t put it down.

Tina Hubert, Executive Director Six Mile Regional Library District

Mexican Gothic is available from the Six Mile Regional Library District in hardback, as an e-book and an e-audiobook.  For more information, visit elibrary.smrld.org or call 618-452-6238 ext. 730.

Ever wonder what your SMRLD librarians are reading? Well now you can follow along at smrld.org/librarianreads with some of their recommendations.


SMRLD Bigger than a Building

Monday, May 18th, 2020

As many of you know, the doors to the Six Mile Regional Library District closed on March 17. We hope you also know that while the doors are closed, we are still here providing remote services and increasing our virtual capabilities.

What you might not know is how much we miss you!

We miss seeing your smiles when we recommend a good book, helping with a homework question, or finding just the information you were looking for. We miss hearing what’s happening in your lives and your recommendations for us.

Everyday we are asked when we’ll reopen again.

We don’t have an exact date, but rest assured we are working hard to do just that.

We will phase our reopening. Soon, we hope to offer curbside service at our Johnson Road location so that you can order and pick up materials. The book drops will open in just a few weeks so you can return the materials you have at home. We are rearranging furniture, books, CDs, and DVDs so that you will be able to visit us in-person at our Delmar Avenue library to use the computers, apply for passports, purchase your license plate renewal stickers, register to vote, get items notarized, pick up fishing and hunting licenses, and much more.

Yes, things will look and be different. We won’t have in-person events for a while and there won’t be any seating (other than for computer use) while we have to limit the number of people and comply with social distancing guidelines in the building. However, know that every day we are one step closer to providing you the full service you deserve, expect, and are used to getting from us. We look forward to seeing you soon!

Keep checking our website, Facebook, and other social media for updates.


Granite City Books on Buses program in the news

Friday, August 9th, 2019

Books on Buses Program in Granite City

Tuesday, July 30th, 2019

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Books on Buses Program in Granite City

Granite City – Tuesday, July 30, 2019

With the 2019-2020 school year, students in Granite City will be able to find a good book to read while traveling between home and school on select school buses.  This pilot program is a partnership between Granite City Community Unit School District #9, North America Central School Bus, and Six Mile Regional Library District.

During the Spring of 2019, SMRLD Executive Director Tina Hubert contacted Don Harris, Director of Student Services for the Granite City School District, after reading an article about how a bucket of books was added to an Arkansas school bus to encourage students to read.  Tina then met with Mr. Harris; Paula Hubbard, GCSD#9 Director of Special Education and Region 1; Pat Coleman, Granite City Contract Manager North America Central School Bus; and Erica Hanke-Young, SMRLD Youth Services Manager to discuss a new partnership and the logistics of bringing this pilot program to GCSD#9 students.  It was decided to begin with a few select buses, in order to iron out any wrinkles in the program before it goes district-wide. 

The Books on Buses program is similar to the Little Free Library concept where folks are invited to Take a Book, Share a Book.  Six Mile Regional Library District is supplying the books for ages 5-15, and North America Central School Bus is providing safe containers to hold the books on the buses.  Books are entirely free and do not have due dates – students can read the books on the buses, take books home, return the books to the buses to share with others and to choose new titles to read, or even keep favorite books.  While every student in the Granite City School District is encouraged to get their free SMRLD library card, a library card is not needed for the Books on Buses program.

The enthusiasm for this new partnership was automatic.  It’s a win-win for everyone.  The books give the kids something to do while on the bus and promotes literacy at the same time. GCSD Superintendent Jim Greenwald states, “Books on Buses is another outstanding example of the many services offered by the Six Mile Regional Library District.  They have many programs to make reading fun for the students, and what a novel way to continue the learning process to and from school.

All three organizations share the same service boundaries.  Many people who grew up in Granite City fondly remember the Library’s Bookmobile.  While a full-fledge bookmobile is beyond either the School District or Library District budgets, this new Books on Buses program is a way to reach out in a somewhat similar fashion to students throughout the area.

GCSD Mission: Our district is committed to providing a safe learning environment, which enables all students to develop intellectually, physically, morally, and emotionally to the very best of their abilities.

NACSB Mission: To provide safe, reliable and efficient transportation services that enrich the lives of the communities we serve.

SMRLD Mission:  The Library makes a significant difference in the everyday lives of the people, institutions, and communities of Granite City, Mitchell, and Pontoon Beach.

For more information, call (618) 452-6238.

Contacts:     Erica Hanke-Young, Youth Services Manager (618) 452-6238 ext. 787
                      Tina Hubert, Executive Director (618) 452-6238 ext. 781


Service Review 2018: SMRLD by the Numbers

Thursday, January 17th, 2019
Service Review 2018

2001 Delmar

ClosedToday: 9:00 am - 6:00 pm

2145 Johnson

ClosedToday: 9:00 am - 6:00 pm

Upcoming Events

Sat 23

Nintendo Switch

October 23 @ 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Mon 25

Story Time @Delmar Ave

October 25 @ 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Mon 25

Book Club!

October 25 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

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